The report issued today covers the performance of the Judicial Conduct Investigations Office (JCIO) during the year 2017-2018.[1] Copies of the report are lodged in both houses of Parliament. The report is also published on our reports and publications page.

The JCIO received a total of 2,147 complaints against judicial office holders between 1 April 2017 and 31 March 2018. Of the complaints received, 1506 (70%) related to judicial decisions and, consequently, did not meet the statutory criteria for investigation. Of those cases that did progress to investigation, the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice jointly took disciplinary action in 39 cases.

There were approximately 23,000 members of the full and part-time judiciary during the period covered by this report. The number of cases in which disciplinary action was taken equates to less than 0.2% of judicial office holders.

 

 

 

 

[1] The Constitutional Reform Act 2005 gives the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice joint responsibility for judicial discipline. The JCIO is an independent body which provides advice to the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice on judicial disciplinary issues, but has no power to make a finding of misconduct. Only the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice can jointly determine whether a complaint amounts to misconduct and, if so, issue a disciplinary sanction.